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Pontiac Silverdome, Pontiac, Michigan
Super Bowl 51
Image by Ken Lund
The Pontiac Silverdome, formerly known as the Silverdome, was a stadium located in Pontiac, Michigan, United States. It opened in 1975 and sits on 127 acres (51 ha) of land. When the stadium opened, it featured a fiberglass fabric roof held up by air pressure, the first use of the technique in a major athletic facility. The roof has since been removed. With a seating capacity of 82,000, it was the largest stadium in the National Football League (NFL) until FedEx Field in suburban Washington, D.C., opened in 1997.

It was primarily the home of the Detroit Lions of the NFL from 1975 to 2001 and was also home to the Detroit Pistons of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1978 to 1988. In addition, the Silverdome also served as the home venue for the Detroit Express of the North American Soccer League and the Michigan Panthers of the United States Football League, as well as two college bowl games: the Cherry Bowl and the Motor City Bowl. In 2012 the Silverdome served as the home venue of the Detroit Mechanix of the American Ultimate Disc League and hosted the league championship game that season.

The stadium was a regular concert venue and hosted a number of athletic and non-athletic events, including Wrestlemania III, early round games of the 1994 FIFA World Cup, Super Bowl XVI, regional games in the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament, and the 1979 NBA All-Star Game.

After the opening of Ford Field in 2002, the stadium was left without a permanent tenant. It first closed in 2006, but after multiple attempts to solicit redevelopment plans, the city sold the stadium at auction in 2009. It reopened in 2010 and hosted several events, but closed again by 2013. The roof was deflated in 2013 and has since been removed. Owners auctioned the stadium’s contents in 2014 with no future development through June 2015. The owners announced on October 29, 2015, that the dilapidated facility will be demolished beginning in the Spring of 2016.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Silverdome

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Pontiac Silverdome, Pontiac, Michigan
Super Bowl 51
Image by Ken Lund
The Pontiac Silverdome, formerly known as the Silverdome, was a stadium located in Pontiac, Michigan, United States. It opened in 1975 and sits on 127 acres (51 ha) of land. When the stadium opened, it featured a fiberglass fabric roof held up by air pressure, the first use of the technique in a major athletic facility. The roof has since been removed. With a seating capacity of 82,000, it was the largest stadium in the National Football League (NFL) until FedEx Field in suburban Washington, D.C., opened in 1997.

It was primarily the home of the Detroit Lions of the NFL from 1975 to 2001 and was also home to the Detroit Pistons of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1978 to 1988. In addition, the Silverdome also served as the home venue for the Detroit Express of the North American Soccer League and the Michigan Panthers of the United States Football League, as well as two college bowl games: the Cherry Bowl and the Motor City Bowl. In 2012 the Silverdome served as the home venue of the Detroit Mechanix of the American Ultimate Disc League and hosted the league championship game that season.

The stadium was a regular concert venue and hosted a number of athletic and non-athletic events, including Wrestlemania III, early round games of the 1994 FIFA World Cup, Super Bowl XVI, regional games in the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament, and the 1979 NBA All-Star Game.

After the opening of Ford Field in 2002, the stadium was left without a permanent tenant. It first closed in 2006, but after multiple attempts to solicit redevelopment plans, the city sold the stadium at auction in 2009. It reopened in 2010 and hosted several events, but closed again by 2013. The roof was deflated in 2013 and has since been removed. Owners auctioned the stadium’s contents in 2014 with no future development through June 2015. The owners announced on October 29, 2015, that the dilapidated facility will be demolished beginning in the Spring of 2016.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Silverdome

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Pontiac Silverdome, Pontiac, Michigan
Super Bowl 51
Image by Ken Lund
The Pontiac Silverdome, formerly known as the Silverdome, was a stadium located in Pontiac, Michigan, United States. It opened in 1975 and sits on 127 acres (51 ha) of land. When the stadium opened, it featured a fiberglass fabric roof held up by air pressure, the first use of the technique in a major athletic facility. The roof has since been removed. With a seating capacity of 82,000, it was the largest stadium in the National Football League (NFL) until FedEx Field in suburban Washington, D.C., opened in 1997.

It was primarily the home of the Detroit Lions of the NFL from 1975 to 2001 and was also home to the Detroit Pistons of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1978 to 1988. In addition, the Silverdome also served as the home venue for the Detroit Express of the North American Soccer League and the Michigan Panthers of the United States Football League, as well as two college bowl games: the Cherry Bowl and the Motor City Bowl. In 2012 the Silverdome served as the home venue of the Detroit Mechanix of the American Ultimate Disc League and hosted the league championship game that season.

The stadium was a regular concert venue and hosted a number of athletic and non-athletic events, including Wrestlemania III, early round games of the 1994 FIFA World Cup, Super Bowl XVI, regional games in the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament, and the 1979 NBA All-Star Game.

After the opening of Ford Field in 2002, the stadium was left without a permanent tenant. It first closed in 2006, but after multiple attempts to solicit redevelopment plans, the city sold the stadium at auction in 2009. It reopened in 2010 and hosted several events, but closed again by 2013. The roof was deflated in 2013 and has since been removed. Owners auctioned the stadium’s contents in 2014 with no future development through June 2015. The owners announced on October 29, 2015, that the dilapidated facility will be demolished beginning in the Spring of 2016.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Silverdome

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…